Enjoy the Last of the Season’s Mangoes! Health Benefits You Probably Didn’t Know

These are considered as the major fruit of the year. Mango is the king of fruits because it is incredibly delicious and is able to satisfy our taste buds in so many ways. But did you know mangoes are not just sweet, creamy fruits but they have a range of possible health benefits. They are highly popular around the world and come in a range of flavors that make them the ultimate fruit. In this article, I want to share some of the most amazing advantages you can take on with eating mangoes. These are the ultimate fruit you need to add into your platter!
Mango flesh contains prebiotic dietary fibre, which helps feed good bacteria in the gut. Healthy gut is detrimental for a healthy state. Leaky gut, apart from poor digestion results in skin conditions like IBS, asthma, slow metabolism and other health issues. So this is one of the major reasons why you should be having mangoes every now and then!

Another thing is how an average-sized mango contains upto two-third of the daily recommended intake of vitamin C. The powerful antioxidant helps boost immunity system and prevents cold/flu. This makes it the ultimate choice when you wish to take on a range of vitamins which makes your diet special and allows you to have wholesome food. One cup of mango provides about a quarter of the daily target for vitamin A, a nutrient that’s essential for proper functioning of the immune system (including the production and activity of white blood cells). Not getting enough of the vitamin is associated with a greater susceptibility to infections. So make your diet manho enriched
Not just that, as it turns out, mangoes in the diet may also help promote your eye health. Mangoes are rich in beta-carotene that helps in the production of Vitamin A. The powerful antioxidant helps improve vision, boosts overall eye health and even prevents age-related macular degeneration or loss of vision. This makes them a major addition into your diet. The antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin found in mangos help your eyes in several ways. The two natural compounds, which protect the retina and lens, have been shown to increase visual range, lessen discomfort from glare, enhance visual contrast, and reduce the time it takes the eyes to recover from the stress of bright lights. The duo also protect eyes from harmful ultraviolet rays, and fight or slow the progression of cataracts and macular degeneration.
Eating mangoes could also help regulate your cholesterol levels too. The high levels of fibre pectin may help bring down the low-density lipoprotein (LDL or bad cholesterol) which causes plaques in the vessels and blocks blood flow. So this is why people who are suffering from health concerns including cholesterol concerns, should try to consume mangoes on a regular basis.
The vitamin A in mangos is also key for the development and maintenance of multiple types of epithelial tissues, including skin, hair, and sebaceous glands. The latter, which are attached to hair follicles, help keep hair moisturized and healthy. (In animal research, a Vitamin A deficiency has been tied to hair loss.) One cup of mango also supplies about 75% of the daily minimum vitamin C intake. This nutrient is needed to produce collagen, a type of tissue that gives skin its elasticity and helps prevent wrinkles and sagging.
Some wonder if mangoes can help in losing weight. Possibly. Fruit, including mangoes, contains a lot of water and soluble fiber. Both help fill you up so you aren’t hungry, which is great for helping with weight control. If you’re full because you’ve eaten low-calorie, nutritious fruit, you’re less likely to binge on, say, high-calorie processed snacks. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel-like substance, and has been the subject of much weight-loss research. Mangoes have a glycemic index (GI) score of 51, which means it’s a low GI food. GI is a value assigned to a food according to how it influences blood glucose; foods that have a low value are thought to foster weight loss. Mangoes rank lower than watermelon (76) and pineapple (59), and above, for example, dates (42).
Choosing Mangoes!
Choose mangoes that have a nice balance between firmness and softness, Allen says. Ripe mangoes look more yellow and reddish; if you buy ripe ones, put them in the refrigerator. If you choose unripe ones, leave them at room temperature. To extend the shelf life of ripe mangoes, consider freezing them, she suggests. Dice some up and put them in a ziplock bag, and you’ll have a supply at the ready when you’re making smoothies.You can enjoy mango by itself as a sweet snack, but its tropical flavor pairs well with a lot of other foods, too. Slice it and add it to smoothies, salsas, yogurt, or desserts. Mango can also be good for savory dishes, and you can grill it to caramelize its natural sugars. You can also toss the fruit into your favorite salad or pair it with peppers in a traditional mango chicken dish. Sauté diced chicken with bell peppers, soy sauce, ginger, and garlic, and stir in diced mango, Stefanow recommends.



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