How to find a good doctor???

How to find a good doctor???

Choosing a primary care doctor is one of the most important health decisions you’ll make. And thanks in part to the affordable care act, which has dramatically increased the number of people with health insurance, more people than ever are now searching for a physician they can call their own. Unfortunately, it’s hard to find reliable, easy-to-understand information about specific doctors or practices. But do you really want to find a doctor the same way you do a restaurant or plumber? Probably not! Still, there are strategies and resources that can help you find a new doctor or check up on one you already have. Here’s why it’s so important to find a good primary care doctor, what to focus on in your search, and where to go for the information you need. Growing research suggests that people who have a strong relationship with a physician not only report greater satisfac­tion with their care but also may enjoy better health. That makes sense, because having good communication and col­lab­oration with the doctor who oversees your care can help make sure you get the tests and treatments you need, and avoid common problems, such as getting duplicative or contradictory treatments from a legion of specialists.

Here our editor makes the list of state-by-state resources for more on how to choose a doctor. 

Does your doctor respect you?

While people may interpret ‘respect’ in various ways, the first sign for me personally is time management. If a person cannot respect the appointment time, makes you wait for hours clearly he doesn’t have much regard for the quality of your life. Given you only get so much time, spending hours of it in waiting rooms just shows lack of respect. If your doctor is money making machine be very cautious.

Consider hospital affiliation…

Your choice of doctor can determine which hospital you go to, if needed, so find out where the doctor has admitting privileges to see how their facility compares with other hospitals in your area.

Is your doctor jumping into signing you up?

If your doctor hasn’t taken time to understand your concerns completely and wholeheartedly in the first consultation, chances are they’re not interested in you, they’re interested in the business you bring.

Does he volunteer references?

A great doctor should have the right qualification, the right experience and since both of those are not particularly personal, the right references seal the deal. If you’re headed for a new procedure, do ask your doctor to give you references. Some people don’t like their identity revealed but the doctor is bound to have some satisfied customers who are willing to speak to you.

Has your doctor discussed ‘all’ options with you?

Most people come in with a preconceived notion of what they want. A responsible doctor will discuss all options available to the patient starting with the least invasive. This may not make you too happy but if your doctor doesn’t discuss all possible options it’s just not nice.

Has your doctors discussed the risks with you?

All cosmetic procedures, no matter how run of the mill, come with minor risks. Every patient responds differently to treatments and therefore any ethical doctor will discuss the risks and potential concerns with you. We’ve personally had consultations where doctors smile saying ‘I’ve done this a million times’ that is very reassuring indeed however, if this is the first time you’re treating, please take the time to explain the risks.

Is he willing to address all your questions?

A good doctor will satisfy any query. Any attentive doctor will give you the due importance; take time to address all your questions no matter how trivial. They will in fact encourage questions and address each one to fully satisfy you before getting into any procedure.

Has your doctor done a medical background check?

While cosmetic procedures may or may not require an extensive medical checkup, it is important that your doctor runs through your medical history to identify any potential complications that may arise as a consequence of a prevailing condition. Additionally, this background check needs to be both physical and psychological. Sometimes we have an exaggerated perception of any flaws we may consider.

How hygienic is the facility?

Anything that has anything to do with medicine should be clean. FULL STOP. Anything that faintly looks unhygienic should be categorically avoided. The cleanliness of the facility is directly representative of the cleanliness of the machines and tools being used. Never compromise on the hygiene.

 “A great doctor should have the right qualification, the right experience and since both of those are not particularly personal, the right references seal the deal…”

“It is important that your doctor runs through your medical history to identify any potential complications that may arise as a consequence of a prevailing condition.”

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Q&A A session with Zaheer  Kiani

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